Prof Luke Glanville

20052022

Research activity per year

Personal profile

Biography

Luke Glanville is an Associate Professor in the Department of International Relations.

He has two books being published in 2021: Sharing Responsibility: The History and Future of Protection from Atrocities (Princeton University Press) and Refuge Reimagined: Biblical Kinship in Global Politics (InterVarsity Press, with Mark R. Glanville).

He is presently completing a volume of translations, co-edited with David Lupher and Maya Feile Tomes, titled Sepúlveda on the Conquest of the Indies, for Oxford University Press. 

Luke is the author of Sovereignty and the Responsibility to Protect: A New History (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014) (winner of Australian Political Science Association Crisp Prize (2016) and CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title Award (2014)). He has placed articles in journals including International Studies Quarterly, European Journal of International RelationsEthics & International Affairs, and European Journal of International Law. He is co-editor of three books and served for ten years as co-editor of the quarterly journal, Global Responsibility to Protect (2010-19). 

Research interests

My research spans past and present thought and practice regarding international protection against atrocities, refugee protection, refugee exclusion, questions of rights, responsibilities, and prioritization, and questions of colonial conquest and rule.

Researcher's projects

Projects in progress include:

A volume of translations, co-edited with David Lupher and Maya Feile Tomes, titled Sepúlveda on the Conquest of the Indies. Includes translations of Sepúlveda's Democrates secundus (1544-45), Apologia (1550), and Proposiciones temerarias, and Las Casas's Aquí se contiene una disputa o controversia… (1552). Under contract with OUP and due to be submitted early 2021.

Qualifications

PhD (University of Queensland)

Research interests

International Political Theory

History of International Thought

Responsibility to Protect

Refugee Protection

Sovereignty

Imperfect Duties