‘It's Dangerous, but these are my People’: The Assimilation of a Catholic Priest among the Meto of Oecussi

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Originally from Pennsylvania, Father Richard Daschbach has lived among the Atoni Pah Meto of West Timor since 1967. In this paper I consider Richard's ministry in the context of the literature on Austronesian cosmological systems, focusing on how his work, though defined by characteristically Meto notions of authority, spirituality and precedence, is also what Collier and Ong have described as a ‘global assemblage’. Tsing's concept of ‘friction’ is used as a way of understanding how both local and notionally universal forces within this encounter have been energised and transformed through their accidental and sometimes uneasy proximity.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)66-82
    JournalThe Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology
    Volume17
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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