A 4000 year-old introduction of domestic pigs into the Philippine Archipelago: implications for understanding routes of human migration through Island Southeast Asia and Wallacea

Philip Piper, Hsiao-chun Hung, Fredeliza Z Campos, Peter Bellwood, Rey Santiago

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    New research into the Neolithic of Island Southeast Asia is broadening the old models and making them more diverse, more human - more like history: people and animals can move through the islands in a multitude of ways. The domestic pig is an important tracker of Neolithic people and practice into the Pacific, and the authors address the controversial matter of whether domestic pigs first reached the islands of Southeast Asia from China via Taiwan or from the neighbouring Vietnamese peninsula. The DNA trajectory read from modern pigs favours Vietnam, but the authors have found well stratified domestic pig in the Philippines dated to c. 4000 BP and associated with cultural material of Taiwan. Thus the perils of relying only on DNA - but are these alternative or additional stories?.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)687-695
    JournalAntiquity
    Volume83
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

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