A 40,000 year wood charcoal record from Carpenter's Gap 1: New insights into palaeovegetation change and indigenous foraging strategies in the Kimberley, Western Australia

Susan O'Connor, Susan Frawley

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    This paper presents the results from analysis of wood charcoal from Carpenter’s Gap 1, a rock shelter with a human-occupation record spanning more than 40,000 years. The phytolith and macrobotanical remains from this site have been previously studied. They provided proxy records of vegetation change over time but each class of palaeobotanical material has distinct taphonomic biases that affect the likelihood that it will be incorporated in the archaeological deposit, and if it is, how well it preserves. The wood charcoal record provides a new line of evidence and helps build a more holistic profile of palaeovegetation local to the site and human foraging strategies over the 40,000 year span of its occupation.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationAltered Ecologies: Fire, climate and human influence on terrestrial landscapes (Terra Australis 32)
    Editors Haberle, S G, Stevenson, J and Prebble, M
    Place of PublicationCanberra Australia
    PublisherANU ePress
    Pages299-321
    Edition1st
    ISBN (Print)9781921666803
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

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