An analysis of provincial, urban and ethnic loyalties in Fiji's 2014 election

Jon Fraenkel

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    For the eight years prior to the September 2014 election in Fiji, no data were available that could enable observers to gauge the extent of support for the Bainimarama government. During that period, a range of conflicting claims emerged about shifting political loyalties within Fiji, largely based on anecdotal evidence. This paper makes use of the micro-level September 2014 election results to enquire about rural/urban, ethnic, class and provincial bases of support for the major parties. It finds that backing for the main opposition party was concentrated in areas with small populations, high levels of out-migration and relatively low voter turnout. Conversely support for the incumbent government was strongest on the more densely populated main island of Viti Levu, particularly in the fastest growing western part of that island.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)38-53
    JournalJournal of Pacific History
    Volume50
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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