An experimental evaluation of tax-reporting schedules: a case of evidence-based tax administration

Michael Wenzel, Natalie Taylor

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    In an experiment in collaboration with the Australian Taxation Office (ATO), rental property schedules (RPS) were sent to taxpayers for them to itemize their deductions and return the RPS to the ATO. The intervention significantly reduced deductions compared to taxpayers who did not have to return the RPS, taxpayers who received only an information letter, and a no-contact control group-regardless of a cooperative versus deterring letter tone and first-time versus second-time participation of taxpayers. The study sheds light on the mechanisms underlying the effects of tax-reporting schedules and highlights the importance of systematic experimental fieldwork in evaluating regulatory strategies.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2785-2799
    JournalJournal of Public Economics
    Volume88
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

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