Balancing Competing Interests and Values: Drone Strikes as National Policy but International Crime?

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    "The national interest" is of questionable utility either as an analytic concept or as a guide to policy. It is neither 'national', with multiple entities that have their own sectoral or sectarian interests as well as many domestic and international nonstate actors who also have interests; not 'interest' in the singular but rather several interests in the plural, with some in competition and conflict; nor, as a result, 'the', "A balance of interests" is a more accurate empirical descriptor and analytical construct that also incorporates human agency and fallibility. Its superiority is especially relevant to international criminal justice, where state and nonstate actors alike have to balance several competing interests at play, choose between competing values, and also choose between material interests and principles, and values.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationThe Global Community: Yearbook of International Law and Jurisprudence 2015
    Editors Giuliana Ziccardi Capaldo
    Place of PublicationNew York
    PublisherOxford University Press
    Pages171-200
    Edition1st
    ISBN (Print)9780190647759
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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