"Born to be a Stoway": Inscriptions, Graffiti, and the Rupture of Space at the North Head Quarantine Station, Sydney

Anne Clarke, Ursula Frederick

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Quarantine was used by British colonial authorities and later by Australian governments to manage and control the introduction of infectious diseases. Facilities at North Head, Manly, New South Wales, were initially built as a specialist institution but as the need for mass quarantine declined over time, the site was used for other forms of social regulation and welfare. This paper explores an enduring tradition of memorialization, commemoration, and in some instances, resistance to the conditions of isolation and confinement found in the mark-making practices of people held at the Quarantine Station from the 1830s to the 1970s
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)521-535pp
    JournalInternational Journal of Historical Archaeology
    Volume20
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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