China's motives and aims in Asia: Are they narrow or wide-ranging? Do they conflict with, or complement, the status quo? Should we judge China primarily according to its words or its actions in Asia?

Louise Merrington

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    Abstract

    When examining China's aims in Asia it is important to look first and foremost at the balance of power in the region. Although the US is the undisputed global hegemon, in East Asia, at least, this is not the case. As Robert Ross notes, "East Asia is bipolar because China is not a rising power but an established regional power. The United States is not a regional hegemon, but shares with China great power status in the balance of power47." This balance comes from the two countries' primacy in different spheres; namely maritime and land-based East Asia. There is also a third sphere, however, which is often overlooked by Western scholars and which has its own balance of power, centred on Russia - Central Asia, to the west of the Chinese hinterland.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - 2010
    EventEmerging Leaders Dialogue 2010 - Brisbane Australia
    Duration: 1 Jan 2010 → …

    Conference

    ConferenceEmerging Leaders Dialogue 2010
    Period1/01/10 → …

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