Digression and indirectness in Japanese writing: Implications for education in the Asian century

Dilhara Premaratne

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Rhetorical conventions used in a text could vary from culture to culture. Linearity, relevance and explicitness are important conventions in English writing. However, the rhetorical conventions observed in English may not necessarily be followed or valued in other cultures. Rhetorical differences could be particularly pronounced between Asian and non-Asian cultures. Such differences could have a significant impact on students in the Asian century due to the increased interaction in the field of education between Asia and the West, especially between Asia and the Anglosphere (United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand). This paper looks at the extent to which culture-specific rhetorical conventions are used in Japanese writing and discusses their implications for students from two perspectives: that of native English-speaker students learning Japanese and international students from Japan pursuing education in English-speaking countries.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-9
    JournalElectronic Journal of Contemporary Japanese Studies
    Volume13
    Issue number4
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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