Does Ethnic Discrimination Vary Across Minority Groups? Evidence from a Field Experiment

Alison Booth, Andrew Leigh, Elena Varganova

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    We conduct a large-scale field experiment to measure labour market discrimination in Australia, one quarter of whose population was born overseas. To denote ethnicity, we use distinctively Anglo-Saxon, Indigenous, Italian, Chinese and Middle Eastern names. We compare multiple ethnic groups, rather than a single minority as in most other studies. In all cases we applied for entry-level jobs and submitted a CV indicating that the candidate attended high school in Australia. We find significant differences in callback rates: ethnic minority candidates would need to apply for more jobs in order to receive the same number of interviews. These differences vary systematically across ethnic groups.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)547-573
    JournalOxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics
    Volume74
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Does Ethnic Discrimination Vary Across Minority Groups? Evidence from a Field Experiment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this