Fake News: Could Self-Regulation of Media Help to Protect the Public? The Experience of the Australian Press Council

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    “Fake news” comes in two forms: false information intended to deceive, and deceitful description of genuine information when it does not accord with the views of the person calling it “fake.” Either way—the reality of false news or the strategy to throw doubt on genuine news and evidence—it threatens to undermine democratic processes, and the broader social fabric. Modern technology is making fake news much easier. People rely on sources that may have no commitment to truth, and groups of people can easily engage only with like-minded people and dismiss alternative perspectives. Yet, new technology is also offering wider and more direct connections, with the potential to better inform the public and provide avenues for people to express their views and engage in public discourse. The challenge is to find a workable ethical regime that supports the positive potential of technology while limiting the risks of negative use and impact. There is no easy answer, but some strengthening of self-regulation within the media and modification of government regulation are required. Each country will need to find the response most likely to work, but some international collaboration is also likely required.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-5
    JournalPublic Integrity
    Volume21
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2019

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