FOUR LESSONS FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES FROM THE TRADE NEGOTIATIONS OVER ACCESS TO MEDICINES

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    After the Agreement on the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) came into operation in 1995 developing countries have found themselves in a process of continual negotiation over intellectual property rights and access to medicines. These negotiations have taken place in the World Trade Organization and in the context of free trade agreements. The paper suggests that the only real win for developing countries has been the Doha Declaration on the TRIPS Agreement and Public Health in 2001. What have been the lessons for developing countries in a decade of negotiations over access to medicines? Drawing on themes of rule complexity and regulatory ritualism the paper discusses four key lessons for developing countries. It concludes by arguing that developing countries will do better if they adopt a networked governance approach to negotiation rather than continuing to rely on traditional coalition formation.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)11-39
    JournalLiverpool Law Review: a journal of contemporary legal issues
    Volume28
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2007

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