Increasing the Proportion of Women in the National Parliament: Opportunities, Barriers and Challenges

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    Throughout Indonesia' history, women have made up only a small proportion of the national parliament. During the New Order period (1966–98), the proportion of women in parliament averaged about 9 per cent, peaking at just over 13 per cent in 1987. The first general election in the post Suharto period was declared free and fair, yet it produced a worrying result for those who had hoped that democracy would bring greater gender justice: the percentage of women elected to the national parliament fell from 10.8 per cent to 8.8 per cent. In 2004 the proportion of women parliamentarians increased to 11.3 per cent, but the magnitude of the increase fell far short of that hoped for by women' groups. In 2009, 17.8 per cent of those elected to the national parliament were female. This represented a historic high for Indonesia, falling just short of the (very low) global average of 18.8 per cent.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProblems of Democratisation in Indonesia: Elections, Institutions and Society
    Editors Edward Aspinall and Marcus Mietzner
    Place of PublicationSingapore
    PublisherInstitute of Southeast Asian Studies (ISEAS)
    Pages219-242
    Edition1st
    ISBN (Print)9789814279901
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

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