Indigenous Developmental Networks and the Non-Developmental State: Making Intellectual Property Work for Indigenous People Without Patents

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    Indigenous people face problems of economic underdevelopment, including in wealthy states such as Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States. The knowledge assets of indigenous people form a potential source of income, but this potential has largely not been realized because of extractive state property orders. Drawing on fieldwork from Australia, the paper argues that indigenous people are addressing the problem of extractive intellectual property orders through developmental networks that protect their knowledge assets. The paper provides examples of how an indigenous developmental network can build capacity and trust by enrolling scientists into its network.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationPatent Law in Global Perspective
    Editors Ruth L. Okediji and Margo A. Bagley
    Place of PublicationNew York, USA
    PublisherOxford University Press
    Pages287-320
    Edition1st
    ISBN (Print)9780199334278
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Indigenous Developmental Networks and the Non-Developmental State: Making Intellectual Property Work for Indigenous People Without Patents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this