Knowledge and beliefs about national development and developmental hierarchies: The viewpoints of ordinary people in thirteen countries

Arland Thornton, Georgina Binstock, Mohammad Abbasi Shavazi, Dirgha Ghimire, Arjan Gjonca, Attila Melegh, Colter Mitchell, Mansoor Moaddel, Yu Xie, Li-shou Yang, Linda Young-DeMarco, Kathryn Yount

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Scholars and policy makers have for centuries constructed and used developmental hierarchies to characterize different countries. The hypotheses motivating this paper are that such social constructions have been circulated internationally, are constructed similarly in various countries, and follow the social constructions of elite international organizations, such as the United Nations. This paper uses data from 15 surveys in 13 diverse countries to study how developmental hierarchies are understood in everyday life. Our research shows that most people have constructions of developmental hierarchies that are similar across countries and are similar to the developmental hierarchies constructed by the United Nations. These findings suggest that developmental hierarchies are widely understood around the world and are widely available to ordinary people as they make decisions about many aspects of life.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1053-1068
    JournalSocial Science Research
    Volume41
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Knowledge and beliefs about national development and developmental hierarchies: The viewpoints of ordinary people in thirteen countries'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this