Lapita pottery from the small islands of north-east Malakula, Vanuatu: A brief overview and implications

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    A series of well-preserved Lapita sites was first identified on the small islands of Uripiv, Wala, Atchin and Vao, Malakula, in northern Vanuatu in 2001–2002. Further excavation on Vao and particularly Uripiv continued until 2011. The pottery shows the standard similarities with Lapita pottery generally but also demonstrates the development of very distinctive regional and even island-specific variation in form and motif design during the Lapita period. It suggests very rapid change in pottery form and decoration soon after initial colonisation of the archipelago; an aspect largely masked by the radiocarbon chronology. It also confirms that regional diversification was well underway during the Lapita period itself. This may relate both to the potential that these communities came from different origin points further west and that even during a single generation a range of factors may have encouraged localisation in a range of practices including pottery production.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationDebating Lapita: Distribution, Chronology, Society and Subsistence
    Editors Stuart Bedford & Matthew Spriggs
    Place of PublicationCanberra
    PublisherANU Press
    Pages225-241
    Edition1st
    ISBN (Print)9781760463304
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2019

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