Learner autonomy and blended learning in the language classroom

Mark Gibeau, Jun Imaki

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    Abstract

    This contribution is based on a pilot study intended to examine the effect of increased learner autonomy through blended learning on student engagement, satisfaction and target language proficiency improvements in an intermediate Japanese language class. Data collected for this target study was limited largely to voluntary, anonymous student self-reporting and a comparison of statistical data gathered from anonymous, standardised course evaluation surveys. As a pilot study, the goal is not to reach definitive conclusions but rather to constitute a first step in identifying the 'low hanging fruit' that might be harvested by encouraging student autonomy within the confines of the various fiscal and institutional limitations inherent to the university environment. We seek to identify how, in a cost-effective and sustainable manner, elements of blended learning can be integrated into a course to facilitate greater learner autonomy and to provide learners with a more student-centred and communicative language learning environment.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages471-483
    Publication statusPublished - 2014
    EventLanguages & Cultures Network for Australian Universities Colloquium (LCNAU 2013) - The Second National LCNAU Colloquium - Canberra, Australia
    Duration: 1 Jan 2014 → …

    Conference

    ConferenceLanguages & Cultures Network for Australian Universities Colloquium (LCNAU 2013) - The Second National LCNAU Colloquium
    Period1/01/14 → …

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