Martin Wight, Western Values, and the Whig Tradition of International Thought

Christopher (Ian) Hall

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Martin Wight is often regarded as a disengaged historian of international thought who avoided commentary on contemporary events and shunned opportunities to contribute to discussion over policy. This article argues that this interpretation is mistaken. It argues instead that Wight was deeply concerned with the practice of international relations, as well as the theory, and sought repeatedly to find and use different means to influence British foreign policy and world politics more generally. To that end, it concentrates on one particular effort: Wight's attempt to construct a set of Whig or Western values that he believed should guide the conduct of practitioners.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)961-981
    JournalThe International History Review
    Volume36
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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