(Not) All Roads Lead to Rome: Ending Impunity for International Crimes in Southeast Asia

Christoph Sperfeldt, Emma Palmer

    Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

    Abstract

    More than a decade after its entry into force, the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (‘ICC’) is enjoying widespread global support. With 124 States Parties, as of 4 March 2016, more than 60 percent of states have joined this trend. Despite this global diffusion and normalisation of the norms of international criminal justice, states in Asia remain on the whole reluctant to join the Rome Statute. Only three of 11 states in the sub-region of Southeast Asia have ratified the Statute, significantly below the global average. Although Cambodia and Timor Leste were among the founding members of the ICC, they remained exceptions until recently. Thailand has signed, but hesitates to ratify the Rome Statute
    Original languageEnglish
    Commissioning bodyForum for International Criminal and Humanitarian Law
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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