Pathologies or progress? Evaluating the effects of divided government and party volatility

Fiona Yap, Youngmi Kim

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    A vast body of literature emphasizes that successful political development relies on stable and united political parties that underpin clear and responsive policymaking. By this perspective, divided government and party volatility represent pathologies that imperil political accountability and development. Indeed, studies contend that divided government - where different parties control the executive and legislative branches of government - lead to policy deadlock while party volatility - characterized by frequent party splits, solo switches, mergers, dissolutions or the establishment of new parties - confounds representation and accountability. Clearly, each on its own is seen as a considerable threat to political performance and democratic development; the confluence of the two points virtually to an inevitable political doom.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)261-268
    JournalJapanese Journal of Political Science
    Volume9
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

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