Phonotactics and the prestopped velar lateral of Hiw: resolving the ambiguity of a complex segment

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Complex segments consisting of two phases are potentially ambivalent as to which phase determines their phonemic status - e.g. whether /tn/ is a stop or a nasal. This theoretical problem is addressed here with respect to a typologically unusual phoneme in Hiw, an endangered Oceanic language of Vanuatu. This complex segment, /gL/, combines a velar voiced stop and a velar lateral approximant. Similar phonemes, in the few languages which have them, have been variously described as (laterally released) stops, affricates or (prestopped) laterals. The nature of Hiw /gL/ can be established from its patterning in tautosyllabic consonant clusters. The licensing of word-initial CC clusters in Hiw complies with the Sonority Sequencing Principle, albeit with some adjustments. Consequently, the well-formedness of words like /megLejininverted e/ 'berserk' relies on /gL/ being analysed as a prestopped velar lateral approximant - the only liquid in the system.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)393-434
    JournalPhonology
    Volume27
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

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