Power, pork and patronage: Decentralisation and the politicisation of the development budget in Papua New Guinea

Matthew Allen, Zahid Hasnain

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This paper examines a number of recent empirical studies of local-level decision-making in relation to development planning and, especially, the allocation of state development funds in Papua New Guinea. The discussion is framed by the extensive theoretical and Papua New Guinea literature on patronage politics and political culture, by the recent history of decentralisation reforms, and by the frequently articulated, but largely anecdotal, observations about the functioning of district and local-level governance processes.In contrast to the anecdotal vision of widespread and chronic dysfunctionality, the studies considered here paint a picture of considerable spatial and regional variation. We offer some tentative hypotheses to explain this variation, while flagging the need for more empirical work. We outline how these preliminary findings have informed a program of research that is currently being undertaken at the district and local government levels with a view to gaining a better understanding of the extent and nature of spatial variation in the local-level governance of state development funds in Papua New Guinea.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)7-31
    JournalCommonwealth Journal of Local Governance
    Volume6
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Power, pork and patronage: Decentralisation and the politicisation of the development budget in Papua New Guinea'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this