Public satisfaction with police: The importance of procedural justice and police performance in police-citizen encounters

Kristina (Tina) Murphy

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    A large body of literature has demonstrated that when authorities use procedural justice with those they regulate, people will be more satisfied with those authorities and will be more willing to cooperate and comply with their directions and rules. In the context of policing, procedural justice has also been shown to be important for shaping citizens' views about police legitimacy, their satisfaction with police and also in fostering cooperation with police. What remains largely unexamined, however, is whether the positive effect of procedural justice varies across different types of police-citizen encounters. Using survey data collected from a national sample of 1,462 Australians, the present study will examine the relative importance of procedural justice on overall ratings of police satisfaction across two types of police-citizen encounters (citizen-initiated contacts and police-initiated contacts). It will be shown that procedural justice is most important in police-initiated contacts, while police performance is most important in citizen-initiated contacts.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)159-178
    JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology
    Volume42
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

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