Reconciliation or exclusion? Integrating indigenous and non-indigenous land management concepts for Australia's Native Title era

Elspeth A Young

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Indigenous and non-indigenous concepts of land ownership and use are fundamental elements in Australian debate on the implications of Native Title for development. However these approaches are not necessarily incompatible but can be reconciled. Drawing on evidence from the central Australian rangelands, this paper argues that the adaptations of land use practised by indigenous people, who have converted their land tenure from pastoral leasehold to Aboriginal freehold land, suggest that such reconciliation is possible and practical. Provision of appropriate support tools, such as participatory extension for improved land management, or community land management planning, strengthen the integration of indigenous and non-indigenous land management approaches. Successful integration will be essential for the management of Australia's rangelands under Native Title.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)159-171
    JournalAsia Pacific Viewpoint
    Volume40
    Publication statusPublished - 1999

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Reconciliation or exclusion? Integrating indigenous and non-indigenous land management concepts for Australia's Native Title era'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this