Reforming Chinese characters in the PRC and Japan: New directions in the twenty-first century

Dilhara Premaratne

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This article provides a comparative evaluation of Chinese character reform in the People's Republic of China and Japan, with a particular focus on the latest changes announced in 2009 to the existing script policies in the two countries. The first Chinese script reform took place in 1956 and the first Japanese script reform in 1946, both for the purpose of simplifying the scripts to facilitate mass education. In the 1980s, prompted by nationalistic sentiments and economic security, both countries backtracked on their script reform policies and adopted a more conservative approach that put an end to any further simplification of the script. The conservative trend which continued into the new millennium is reflected in the two latest reforms. Both China and Japan have moved further away from phonetizing the script in their effort to address issues related to information and communication technology.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)305-319
    JournalCurrent Issues in Language Planning
    Volume13
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Reforming Chinese characters in the PRC and Japan: New directions in the twenty-first century'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this