Revisiting Southeast Asian History with Geology: Some Demographic Consequences of a Dangerous Environment

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    New geological research strengthens a growing sense of Indonesian history as one unusually exposed to the vagaries of nature. In periods of relative quiescence on the ring of fire, such as the twentieth century, a benign climate and fertile soils can produce rapid population growth and development. But rather than forming a constant, this pattern appears to have been interrupted by periodic disasters. Cooperation between scholars in different disciplines, and the pooling of data from around the Indian Ocean, offers a way forward in understanding the long-term pattern of the region and makes a huge difference to our understanding of the Southeast Asian past, and therefore likely future.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationNatural Hazards and Peoples in the Indian Ocean World: Bordering on Danger
    Editors Greg Bankoff and Joseph Christensen
    Place of PublicationNew York
    PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
    Pages31-53
    Edition1st edition
    ISBN (Print)978-1-349-94856-7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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