Sailing up the Map: A re-examination of constructs of Javaneseness in the light of new evidence

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    While Java's culture has extended to other parts of Indonesia and mainland Southeast Asian countries (on Angkor under Jayavarman II, for example, and on the Chams) it exerted even stronger influence on a more distant country, Japan. The encounter pre-dated Indianisation and was between the Jomon population of Japan - a decentralised population living by hunting, fishing, and gathering - and wet-rice growing Javanese immigrants who had an advanced and much more centralised political organisation and sophisticated technology, art and culture. We need thus to adjust our ideas about the antiquity of Javaneseness and the length of time this civilisation has been in contact with other cultures.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)23-39
    JournalIndonesia and the Malay World
    Volume34
    Issue number98
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

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