Securitising transnational crime: the political drivers of police cooperation between Australia and Indonesia

Michael McKenzie

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Why are national police forces increasingly seeking to work together to combat crime? Scholars agree that these cooperative efforts are not simply a response to a growth in transnational crime but debate remains about the broader social and political dynamics involved. Through a case study of the policing relationship between Australia and Indonesia, this article argues that the increasing tendency of governments to frame transnational crime as a security issue is a central driver of international police cooperation. To illustrate this 'securitising' discourse, the article discusses various 'wars on crime' prosecuted by the two countries since the 1970s.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)333-348
    JournalPolicing and Society: an international journal of research & policy
    Volume29
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2019

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