"Sengoki ni okeru Zairyû Tokubetsu Kyoka Seido o Megutte" (On the Special Permission to Stay System in the Postwar Period)

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    This chapter examines the central place played by the discretionary “special permission to stay” system in immigration to Japan in the postwar period. Japan’s postwar Migration Control Act gave extensive discretionary powers to the government to deport certain foreigners from Japan, but also to allow others to remain even though they did not fulfill the normal legal criteria. The sudden closing of the border between Japan and its former colony Korea from 1946 onward, and the redefinition of Koreans in Japan from the status of “colonial subject” to the status of “foreigner”, created many social problems. A large number of families became divided, with some family members in Japan and others in Korea, unable to enter Japan legally. As a result, there was substantial illegal entry by boatpeople from Korea in the late 1940s, 1950s and 1960. The chapter explores the process by which some of these undocumented migrants obtained “special permission to stay”, but also highlights the arbitrary nature of the system and its potential to encourage corruption or to cause give rise to injustices.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationHiseiki Taizaisha to Zairyu Tokubetsu Kyoka: Ijushatachi no Kako, Genzai, Mirai (Undocumented Residents and Special Permission to Stay: The Past, Present and Future of Migrants)
    Editors Kondô Atsushi, Shiobara Yoshikazu and Suzuki Eriko
    Place of PublicationTokyo
    PublisherNihon Hyoronsha
    Pages35-51
    Edition1st
    ISBN (Print)9784535518070
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

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