Subjective wellbeing at different spatial scales for individuals satisfied and dissatisfied with life

Ida Kubiszewski, Nabeeh Zakariyya, Diane Jarvis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Indicators that attempt to gauge wellbeing have been created and used at multiple spatial scales around the world. The most commonly used indicators are at the national level to enable international comparisons. When analyzing subjective life satisfaction (LS), an aspect of wellbeing, at multiple spatial scales in Australia, variables (drawn from environmental, social, and economic domains) that are significantly correlated to LS at smaller scales become less significant at larger sub-national scales. The reverse is seen for other variables, which become more significant at larger scales. Regression analysis over multiple scales on three groups (1) all individuals within the sample, (2) individuals with self-reported LS as dissatisfied (LS ≤ 5), and (3) individuals self-reporting LS as satisfied (LS > 5), show that variables critical for LS differ between subgroups of the sample as well as by spatial scale. Wellbeing measures need to be created at multiple scales appropriate to the purpose of the indicator. Concurrently, policies need to address the factors that are important to wellbeing at those respective scales, segments, and values of the population.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-25
    JournalPeerJ
    Volume7
    Issue numbere6502
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2019

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Subjective wellbeing at different spatial scales for individuals satisfied and dissatisfied with life'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this