The application of X-ray fluorescence core scanning in multi-element analyses of a stratified archaeological cave deposit at Wee Jasper, Australia

Fenja Theden-Ringl, Patricia S Gadd

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Archaeological sediments retain elements from natural and anthropogenic inputs for many years, often forming stratified geochemical records of site formation and human use. This study evaluates the validity and potential of an X-ray fluorescence core scanner (XRF-CS) to contribute to the histories of stratified archaeological sites. Geochemical data sets from an archaeological deposit at Wee Jasper in southeast Australia are obtained using two sediment preparation techniques; the results are compared to trends identified through cultural artefacts and several more traditional methods of sediment analysis. Potential anthropogenic and organic element signatures are identified, and the sediment preparation techniques are evaluated. Minimally processed bulk samples provide consistent XRF results that strongly correlate with the trends observed in other proxies; results from unprocessed sediment columns, however, reveal methodological complications with the XRF-CS technique due to topographical and structural inconsistencies in the columns.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)241-251pp
    JournalJournal of Archaeological Science: Reports
    Volume14
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The application of X-ray fluorescence core scanning in multi-element analyses of a stratified archaeological cave deposit at Wee Jasper, Australia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this