The consequences of urban air pollution for child health: What does self-reporting data in the Jakarta metropolitan area reveal?

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Since the early 1990s, the air pollution level in the Jakarta Metropolitan Area (JMA) has arguably been one of the highest among mega cities in developing countries. This paper utilises the self-reporting data on illnesses available in the 2004 National Socio-Economic Household Survey (Survei Sosial Ekonomi Nasional, or SUSENAS) to test the hypothesis that air pollution impacts human health, particularly among children, in JMA. Test results confirm that air pollution, represented by the PM10 level in a sub-district, does significantly correlate with the level of human health problems, represented by the number of restricted activity days (RAD) in the previous month. The results also show that a given level of PM10 concentration is more hazardous for children.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)527-549
    JournalMasyarakat Indonesia: Majalah Ilmu-Ilmu Sosial Indonesia
    Volume39
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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