The Emo site (OAC), Gulf Province, Papua New Guinea: Resolving long-standing questions of antiquity and implications for the history of the ancestral Hiri maritime trade

Bruno David, Jean-Michel Geneste, Ken Aplin, Jean-Jacques Delannoy, Nick Araho, Christopher J Clarkson, Kate Connell, Simon Haberle, Bryce Barker, Lara Lamb, John Stanisic, Andrew S. Fairbairn, Robert Skelly, Cassandra Rowe

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Since the 1970s the site of Emo (aka 'Samoa', 'OAC') in the Gulf Province of Papua New Guinea has been cited as one of the earliest-known ceramic sites from the southern Papuan lowlands. This site has long been seen as holding c.2000 year old evidence of post-Lapita long-distance maritime trade from (Austronesian-speaking) Motu homelands in the Central Province, where pottery was manufactured, to the (non-Austronesian) Gulf Province some 400km to the west where pottery was received and for which large quantities of sago were exchanged (the ancestral hiri trade). However, until now the only three radiocarbon dates available for Emo were out of chronostratigraphic sequence, and few details on the site had been published. This paper presents the results of new excavations and the first detailed series of AMS radiocarbon determinations from Emo, thereby resolving long-standing uncertainties about the age of the site and its implications for the antiquity of the long-distance Motuan hiri maritime trade.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)39-54
    JournalAustralian Archaeology
    Volume70
    Issue number70
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The Emo site (OAC), Gulf Province, Papua New Guinea: Resolving long-standing questions of antiquity and implications for the history of the ancestral Hiri maritime trade'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this