The end of ethnic nationalism? Changing conceptions of national identity and belonging among young South Koreans

Emma Campbell

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Historically in South Korea, ideas of nation and nationalism have been based upon the ethnic and cultural homogeneity of all Korean people. More recently, there has been an evolution in South Korean nationalism that is based on strikingly different notions particularly among young people. This paper argues that a new South Korean nationalism is emerging and that it has, what I term, globalised cultural characteristics. These characteristics challenge the role of ethnicity in young people's conception of the South Korean nation and its component members. This paper details the evolution of South Korea's nationalism and explains its implications for Korean politics and society as well as its comparative significance for other national contexts. It also highlights some elements of this evolving nationalism that demonstrate less cosmopolitan characteristics, such as patriarchy and social class, in determining who can be 'imagined' as a member of this changing South Korean nation.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)483-502
    JournalNations and Nationalism
    Volume21
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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