The Failure of Therapy: Belief, Embodiment and the Limits of Pentecostal Healing in Papua New Guinea

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    I explore the view that efficacy in Pentecostal healing depends on confidence, or unwavering belief. My focus is on emic notions of failure-how people explain failures of therapy in their own terms-rather than on failures in the procedure employed or the inadequacies of the healer. Although anthropologists have criticised the notion of belief, my ethnographic example suggests that it remains useful, particularly since in this case it is central to the assessment of failure. The Pentecostals discussed here see belief in a more material way, as embodied and intimately bound up with the reformative project of becoming a born again Christian.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-16
    JournalEthnos: Journal of Anthropology
    VolumeOnline
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2020

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