The fuzzy limits of self-reliance: US extended deterrence and Australian strategic policy

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    Abstract

    As a close US ally, Australia is often seen as a recipient of US extended deterrence. This article argues that in recent decades, Australian strategic policy engaged with US extended deterrence at three different levels: locally, Australia eschews US combat support and deterrence under the policy of self-reliance; regionally, it supports US extended deterrence in Asia; globally, it relies on the US alliance against nuclear threats to Australia. The article argues that in none of these policy areas does the Australian posture conform to a situation of extended deterrence proper. Moreover, when the 2009 White Paper combines all three policies in relation to major power threats against Australia, serious inconsistencies result in Australia's strategic posture-a situation the government should seek to avoid in the White Paper being drafted at the time of writing.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)18-34
    JournalAustralian Journal of International Affairs
    Volume67
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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