The Koizumi-Abe Revolution in Japanese Security Policy: Normative Transformation and Democratic Maturity

Rikki Kersten

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    Since the turn of the twenty-first century we have seen Japan adopt a higher profile in international security, as well as a more assertive stance towards defence and security matters. Japan’s contributions in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, and its 2003 decision to develop ballistic missile defence systems in partnership with the United States, indicate that something fundamental is changing in the way Japan thinks about security. Taboos that have been untouchable to date such as nuclear armament for Japan, constitutional revision and collective self-defence have been broached so regularly that it has become routine to raise them (Pyle 2007: 366–8). As of 2011, Japanese security policy in the post-Cold War era appeared to have embarked on a new trajectory, overturning past practice, policy and norms in the process.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationBilateral Perspectives on Regional Security Australia, Japan and the Asia-Pacific Region
    Editors William T Tow and Rikki Kersten
    Place of PublicationBasingstoke
    PublisherPalgrave Macmillan Ltd
    Pages29-45
    Edition1st
    ISBN (Print)9780230279018
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

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