The Political Decline of Traditional Mama in Indonesia The State, Umma and Nandlatul Ulama

Greg Fealy, Robin Bush

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Political wisdom in Indonesia has long held that its large mass-based Muslim organizations, Nahdlatul Ulama (nu) and Muhammadiyah, are politically influential. Within the current democratizing environment ulama have faced many challenges to their social standing and it is our contention in this article that their socio-political role has been diminished in this environment. In order to gauge this situation, the Asia Foundation, working with Indonesian research organizations, conducted a nation-wide survey to explore the changing ways that these Muslim organizations wield political influence, especially at the local level. The survey results confirm that religious figures, or ulama, within nu and Muhammadiyah, do not wield the same kind of direct political influence as they have historically, but this article also highlights how these leaders are still important power brokers at the local level.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)536-560
    JournalAsian Journal of Social Science
    Volume42
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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