The role of spam in cybercrime: Data from the Australian cybercrime pilot observatory

Roderic Broadhurst, Mamoun Alazab

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    The use of the Internet for the purpose of crime is a rapidly growing phenomenon that requires a proactive and coordinated response (UNODC 2013). Cybercriminals increasingly use sophisticated tools and methods to distribute a wide range of malicious content, often combining deceptive “social engineering” tricks with spam emails, hosting of phishing sites, and identity theft (Smith and Hutchings 2014). Unsolicited bulk, mass emails, or “spam,” pose a global challenge because this remains a major vector for the dissemination of malware.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationCybercrime Risks and Responses. Eastern and Western Perspectives
    Editors Russell G. Smith, Ray Chak-Chung Cheung, Laurie Yiu-Chung Lau
    Place of PublicationBasingstoke and New York
    PublisherPalgrave Macmillan Ltd
    Pages103-120
    Edition1
    ISBN (Print)9781137474155
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The role of spam in cybercrime: Data from the Australian cybercrime pilot observatory'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this