Traditions and Change in Scaphopod Shell Beads in Northern Australia from the Pleistocene to the Recent Past

Jane Balme, Susan O'Connor

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    Beads and pendants made from organic materials including seeds, grass stems, bone, teeth and shells were and remain a common form of body decoration in Australian Aboriginal societies. Those found in pre-Macassan and European archaeological contexts are made of the most durable materials, bone, teeth and shells and, of these, shell beads have been found in the oldest contexts where they date from at least 35,000 years ago. In mainland Australia, shell beads are confined to the north of the continent and archaeological finds are restricted to only two shell varieties – Conus and scaphopod.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationNot Just For Show
    Editors Daniella Bar-Yosef Mayer, Clive Bonsall and Alice Mathea Choyke
    Place of PublicationUnited Kingdom
    PublisherOxbow Books
    Pages7-18pp
    Edition1st
    ISBN (Print)9781785706936
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017

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