"We are all Developing Countries": Canada and International Copyright History: Fault Lines in the Map of International Copyright

Sara Bannerman

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    In this paper I will make three arguments, drawing on the historical experience of Canada with the Berne Convention between 1886, when the Berne Convention was founded, and 1971, its last revision. First, Canada, though aligned with the most powerful countries on issues of international copyright, has a unique and important history with international copyright that is very different from the histories of the major powers. Second, for many middle powers, the Berne Convention was a symbol of progress in international law, and a hallmark of a civilized country. Canada has aligned with the major powers on issues of international copyright. Though this alignment has not always comfortable, it stems in part from a desire to be associated with ideas of progress and civilization, and to be aligned with one’s largest trading partners. Third, I ask, what contribution do middle powers make to the international copyright system today?
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationCopyright Future Copyright Freedom
    Editors Brian Fitzgerald and Benedict Atkinson
    Place of PublicationSydney Australia
    PublisherSydney University Press
    Pages79-96
    Edition1st
    ISBN (Print)9781920899714
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

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