Who inherits what, when? Toward a theory of contact, substrates, and superimposition zones

Mark Donohue

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    There has been much discussion on the kinds of linguistic traits that can be borrowed, and under what circumstances, and the relationship of different kinds of contact to areality. This article suggests that phonological aberrancies, in terms of the family to which a language belongs, in the core phonology are indicative of an older substrate, while morphosyntactic aberrancies indicate superimposition. A case study of Australian phonological systems is analyzed in terms of the typology presented, which when correlated with other nonlinguistic evidence reveals insights into human prehistory in that continent.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationLanguage Typology and Historical Contingency: In honor of Johanna Nichols
    Editors B Bickel, L A Grenoble, D A Peterson & A Timberlake
    Place of PublicationAmsterdam and Philadelphia
    PublisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Company
    Pages219-239
    Edition1st
    ISBN (Print)9789027206855
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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